Details:

This work is part of a series titled "Stages of Fallout" that encompasses compositions on paper in graphite, charcoal and gouache. It draws inspiration from “The Family Fallout Shelter,” a manual distributed to the American public in the 1950s through the US Department of Civil and Defense Mobilization, which guides the process of building a fallout shelter at home.
Unframed
Signed

① Artwork:

Stages of Fallout (mirror world)

This work is part of a series titled Stages of Fallout that encompasses compositions on paper in graphite, charcoal and gouache. It draws inspiration from “The Family Fallout Shelter,” a manual distributed to the American public in the 1950s through the US Department of Civil and Defense Mobilization, which guides the process of building a fallout shelter at home.

This mixed-media drawing depicts two identical barred window structures that mirror each other as in a Rorschach test. The only difference between the two images is a glowing orb of light at the bottom-right corner of one and a black hole of darkness at the top-left corner of the other. The two mysterious objects work as yin and yang: opposite yet interconnected.

Adam Liam Rose explores architecture’s visual language of “safety” within a practice that spans sculpture, installation, video, and drawing. More specifically, the artist mines the difference between real life and the aesthetic tricks various authorities use to numb, soothe, or distract populations from actual or perceived disasters. Ultimately, the artist is drawn to the so-called promise of the architectural imagery of spaces like fallout shelters and how they get defined through our collective memory.

Specs:

15 inches
11 inches

③ Artist:

Adam Liam Rose

New York-based artist Adam Liam Rose explores architecture’s visual language of “safety” within a practice that spans sculpture, installation, video and drawing. More specifically, the artist mines the difference between real life and the aesthetic tricks various authorities use to numb, soothe, or distract populations from actual or perceived disasters. Rose’s large-scale installations act as imaginative stage sets for these incidents, while his drawings manifest the psychological and spiritual associations connected with them. Ultimately, the artist is drawn to the so-called promise of the architectural imagery of spaces like fallout shelters and how they get defined through our collective memory.

Adam Liam Rose:
Stages of Fallout (mirror world), 2022
Graphite, charcoal and paint on paper
11.0 × 15.0 inches /