Details:

This figurative painting explores its subject's self-perception through the lens of queer and feminist theories and our society's racial dogmas. The artist often captures nuanced conversations through her figures' body language, revealing a deep-rooted longing to never be unloved.
Framed: 15.0 x 12.0 x 1.5 in.
Signed

① Artwork:

Dyke gets ready for night out

This figurative painting explores its subject's self-perception through the lens of queer and feminist theories and our society's racial dogmas. The artist compositions employ colorful painted strokes and distinctive mark-making to depict brash and willingly vulnerable figures that exclaim a righteous allegiance to strength and longevity. Sproles often captures nuanced conversations through her figures' body language, revealing the deep-rooted longing to never be unloved—as well as the effects of body trauma. Flaunting their relentless otherness, the artist's figures represent a deeply rooted disconnection.

Sproles intimately understands the lack of femininity in queer binaries. The worth of Black femmes is often discredited—even though they have served as the backbones and pioneers of many social justice movements. Black femmes have been excluded from their own autonomies and shamed for expressing even their most crude desires. Sproles grapples with these notions in works that wonder: "Is there a space where Black femmes can exist authentically and ostentatiously as they desire?"

About this work, Sproles says: "Maybe Joseph Rosenbaum and Anthony Huber can share a glass of wine with the two other Brothers taken in a similar fashion. I rarely have any answers for anything but thought they could all use a bite to eat. I 🚫 know what else to do."

Specs:

9 inches
12 inches
with frame
12 inches
15 inches

③ Artist:

LaNia Sproles

Through her collage, painting and assemblage, LaNia Sproles responds to a lack of space for Black femme desire to authentically exist. Drawing inspiration from queer and feminist theory, the artist frequently depicts figures who are both brash and willingly vulnerable—and also embody memories of heartbreak and abandonment. While acknowledging the relationship between pain and identity, Sproles’ work explores imagery free from the boundaries of social constructs.

LaNia Sproles:
Dyke gets ready for night out, 2021
Colored pencil
12.0 × 9.0 inches /