LOVE HOUSE ON INTEGRATING FURNITURE AND FINE ART

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LOVE HOUSE ON INTEGRATING FURNITURE AND FINE ART

The experts behind one of New York's top design showrooms on how they got their start and the best ways to merge art and design.

Great art and great furniture can feel like competing interests in the same space. Both create the kind of strong visuals that do a lot to establish a room's aesthetic (and its mood). Jared Heinrich and Aric Yeakey, the founders behind New York City-based design showroom Love House, are experts at coordinating the two. They spoke with Platform about the origins of their business, the design "rules" worth breaking and how you can best harmonize the artworks and design objects in your home.

PLATFORM

How did you first get interested in design?

LOVE HOUSE

Design was always a hobby for us. In our 20’s, we would spend hours at each other's apartments rearranging furniture, styling bookshelves and taking trips to different stores to find new pieces. Growing up, Aric’s father was a builder and Jared's mom staged homes, so it was something we were always around as kids.

PLATFORM

What inspired the two of you to start Love House? Did you have any specific goals for what you hoped it would become?

LOVE HOUSE

The main inspiration was to change career paths and take a chance on something we’ve always loved. Our initial goal was to bring our vision to life the best we could in hopes that others would be inspired and believe in it as well. Looking back from when we started to where we are now still feels unreal sometimes.

PLATFORM

Who are some of the most exciting new design talents you’ve come across recently?

LOVE HOUSE

Recently, we have loved seeing the works of F. Taylor Colantonio and Natalia Landowska. Colantonio is creating some incredible forms in papier-mâché that look like they are made of marble, and we are really impressed by the glazes Landowska has mastered for her porcelain lighting series.

PLATFORM

What are some of the ways you’ve seen design evolve in recent years that might have flown under the radar? And is there anything in particular that you really love?

LOVE HOUSE

Since COVID started, it seems like design has become more popular in the mainstream consciousness as people spend more time at home and begin to take note of the pieces they live with. We love to see this newfound interest in small designers and collectible design in people who might have previously furnished their homes exclusively via big box retailers.

PLATFORM

You share strong backgrounds in the visual arts. How do you like to think about the way art relates to furniture and object design?

LOVE HOUSE

Besides that they can be mutual inspirations to one another, they are both pieces of a puzzle, and a space would not feel complete without one or the other.

PLATFORM

Do you have any guidelines for integrating works of art and strong furniture design in a space?

LOVE HOUSE

We don’t have any particular guidelines but are more so guided by the feeling and reaction we have to something. If you get a strong emotion from something, it’s probably meant to be and you’ll enjoy living with the pieces much more than trying to find something that checks a particular box or trend.

PLATFORM

Are there any design "rules" that you think should be broken or you regularly break yourselves?

LOVE HOUSE

“Minimalism” is overrated. “Modern” doesn’t have to mean cold and uncomfortable. We want all of the character and personality!

PLATFORM

When it comes to coordinating artwork and furniture/object design, what are some of the most common misconceptions or missteps you come across?

LOVE HOUSE

Our biggest pet-peeve is when art is hung too high and it feels disconnected from the rest of the room. We see a lot of people play it safe with art, trying to find something that “matches” their room instead of letting the piece speak for itself. Choosing something safe can be a lost opportunity to allow a dialogue between all of the pieces in a room.

PLATFORM

Do you believe that the artwork and furniture/object design in a space have to have a similar style in order to work together? What can people do to maximize the harmony between all of them?

LOVE HOUSE

They don’t have to be in a similar style to work together; they can connect through color, scale, placement, material, or in some cases, have no connection at all and still look beautiful together. Some of the best interiors we’ve seen mix furniture and art from different periods creating an unexpected harmony that can really diversify a collection.

PLATFORM

What do you hope people take away about art and design after visiting Love House?

LOVE HOUSE

That design doesn’t have to be so serious and to experience the unique beauty that is created by designers from around the world sharing their work and story in one space.

PLATFORM

What are you looking forward to most when it comes to the future of Love House (that you’re able to share)?

LOVE HOUSE

There is a lot to look forward to, but we are excited at the idea of having a presence on the West coast in the future and the furniture collaboration we currently have in the works.